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Social Resources
» Campus Life
» Provost
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Social Wellbeing is the result of our positive and regular interactions with others in a variety of settings. Studies have shown that building and maintaining strong relationships is vital to happiness. We’re social creatures who occasionally need a gentle nudge to find the right outlets.

STUDENTS

If spent with close friends, social time can include time at work, at home, on the phone or other forms of communication. The happiest people, one Gallup survey indicated, average six hours of such interaction per day. Those with almost no social investments have an equal chance of having a good and a bad day.

But that’s not all. One study said that for some students, social interactions can help improve mood as much as or more than exercise can.

Speaking of exercise, finding a workout partner makes you more likely to adhere to your planned routines.

Furthermore, the strength of our closest bonds can determine, for example, how rapidly we heal from physical illness or injury.

You’re a decent human being. If you weren’t, you wouldn’t be a Wake Forester. And, no, we’re not just saying so. Every student admitted to this University – and only 30 percent of applicants got in for the Fall of 2013 – was recommended by respected adults such as high school teachers.

If you haven’t found your niche yet, it’s out there waiting for you. One of the best ways is to expand your horizons by joining one of the nearly 200 student organizations on campus. They run the gamut from the Accounting Society to the Young Adult Cancer Awareness Society.

You’ll be amazed at the difference they can make.

FACULTY AND STAFF

If spent with close friends, social time can include time at work, at home, on the phone or other forms of communication. The happiest people, one Gallup survey indicated, average six hours of such interaction per day. Those with almost no social investments have an equal chance of having a good and a bad day.

And contrary to pop-culture-fueled perceptions, social interaction isn’t just for kids anymore. In fact, the older you are, the more you need it.

The Gallup research found, among other things, that the memory of socially active people over the age of 50 declined at less than half the rate of the least socially engaged. Furthermore, the strength of our closest bonds can determine how rapidly we heal from physical illness or injury.

You’re a decent human being. If you weren’t, you wouldn’t be a Wake Forester. And, no, we’re not just saying so. Although interest varies by position, the average job vacancy at the University attracts about 100 applicants. So you’re the 1 percent.