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Emotional

emotional

We have Emotional Wellbeing when we know our pressure points and how to adapt to them. We can handle life’s ups and downs because we accept that they can happen and because we can often make pre-emptive strikes against them by knowing whom and when to ask for help.

STUDENTS

Emotional Wellbeing isn’t about arriving at a destination; it’s about how to make the journey better day by day. Through a variety of resources, including the University Counseling Center, the Office of the Chaplain and the Student Health Service, Wake Forest intends to help the community navigate troubled waters. These professionals’ most important message is often difficult for even brilliant, motivated young people to grasp: Asking for help is a sign of strength.

Nationwide, only one-third of those in need seek relevant treatment. The good news is that such assistance is overwhelmingly effective across all demographics.

Left alone, mental-health issues tend to get worse over time and are highly correlated to risky behaviors such as drug and alcohol use, which have their own dangerous consequences. (Studies suggest that those with anxiety or mood disorders are twice as likely to use illicit drugs as the rest of the American adult population.)

If counseling or other professional services aren’t necessary in your case, you can follow these basic guidelines:

  • Value yourself and your time. Avoid negative self-criticism; take time for hobbies and develop new ones.
  • Exercise and eat right.
  • Develop a support network of friends whose advice you trust.
  • Volunteer in the community.
  • Learn stress-management techniques.
  • Avoid alcohol and other drugs.

FACULTY & STAFF

Emotional Wellbeing isn’t about arriving at a destination; it’s about how to make the journey better day by day. Through a variety of resources, including the University Counseling Center, the Office of the Chaplain and the Student Health Service, Wake Forest intends to help the community navigate troubled waters. These professionals’ most important message is often difficult for even brilliant, motivated young people to grasp: Asking for help is a sign of strength.

Nationwide, only one-third of those in need seek relevant treatment. The good news is that experts’ well trained and thoughtful guidance benefits people across all segments of society.

Left alone, mental-health issues tend to get worse over time and are highly correlated to risky behaviors such as drug and alcohol use, which have their own dangerous consequences. (Studies suggest that those with anxiety or mood disorders are twice as likely to use illicit drugs as the rest of the American adult population.)

Consequences in the workplace are often destructive to careers. They include decreased productivity, missed deadlines and inattentive work product; unwillingness to be a team player; lateness; and safety problems or accidents.

One study indicated that depressed employees were four times more likely to lose their jobs than others.

The biggest problem, however, may be general reluctance to confront the problem.

You are not alone. Depression affects 15 million American adults each year. The 49-to-54 age bracket is among the most heavily impacted.

Depression is a matter of brain chemistry, and in as many as 40 percent of cases, the brain’s difficulty in processing mood-regulating chemicals is passed down. If a parent or sibling has major depression, you are up to three times more likely than the general population to have it, too.

Help is not only possible; it’s highly effective. Various estimates say 80 percent or more of those who seek treatment report considerable reduction of symptoms and restored quality of life. Even in the case of those who lose their jobs, treatment makes a significant positive impact on getting back into the workforce.

And it is readily available on campus through the auspices of the Employee Assistance Program. Call (336) 716-5493 or visit Human Resources at 2598 Reynolda Road.