Intellectual

We attain Intellectual Wellbeing when we view learning as an end unto itself rather than simply a means to a specific personal or professional outcome. We move beyond making observations; we start developing ideas.

Students

As challenging as this educational journey may seem, it has longer than four years to run – regardless of whether it includes additional academic programs. Truth is, we’ve all got several degrees of learning in our future.

Intellectual Wellbeing is characterized by curiosity and a perpetual quest for new ways to help ourselves and those around us. It is dedicated to the notion that the greatest minds go beyond observations and inspire others by cultivating ideas.

Consider this: Do you have the same hobbies and interests  — no additions or deletions – that you had in high school? Probably not. You’ve grown, and that suggests your progress will continue.

But if you get in a rut, consider these options:

  • If your degree progress permits it, take an elective class in something totally different from your major at the next opportunity.
  • Start or continue reading – even a few minutes a day – something outside of your academic requirements. This can be in the form of books or longform magazine articles or anything else that makes you concentrate.
  • Take your interest and turn it into a blog.
  • Consult the Student Union’s website for short courses and take one. These can last as little as two hours in one day. Recent examples include Dress for Success and Graffiti.

Faculty & Staff

Though it may have been a while since you last set foot in a classroom as a student,  your brain isn’t through with you yet.

Intellectual Wellbeing is characterized by curiosity and a perpetual quest for new ways to help ourselves and those around us. It is dedicated to the notion that the greatest minds go beyond observations and inspire others by cultivating ideas.

Consider this: Do you have the same hobbies and interests  — no additions or deletions – that you had in college? Probably not. You’ve grown, and that suggests your progress will continue.

But if the abstraction doesn’t hook you, perhaps the practical will. A 2012 study published in the scientific journal Neurology referenced 101 people who were eventually diagnosed with dementia. Those who had regularly done crossword puzzles, played board games or undertaken similar pursuits had an extra year of mental acuity than those who were not as engaged. The study compared the benefits favorably to a year of college in delaying the onset of mental decline.

As far as the present is concerned, Wake Forest’s Z. Smith Reynolds Library offers a Lifelong Learning division that continually provides new courses.